Some weeks ago I stumbled on an article.

It spoke about how the Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is dead.

Whoa…The EVP dead??!! Who says so?

Maybe the article was supposed to be addressed to global corporates or some specialised audience involved with branding, but the notion of a company not having an EVP…. absolute rubbish in my opinion.

Simply put, to my understanding, an EVP is about the compelling reasons why an employee should work for an employer.

At the time of writing this article the unemployment rate in my region is 5.9% with many of those unemployed a result of the closure of auto related businesses. Unless you are talking about auto-related job categories, it is by no stretch of the imagination a buyers’ market when it comes to applicants. By default shortlists can be relatively tight. After all good employees have jobs and can be quite picky.

With the exception of government entities or highly recognised and news worthy brand names, a number of SME’s may not have the recognisability in the market place for a passive or active job seeker to raise their eyebrow about an advertisement or peak their curiosity at a water cooler chat.

The majority of companies, at least in this region, still have to distil the key ingredients of why someone would want to work for their company more than their competitors, and make those points clear to job seekers. Those points may be wide and varied but still comprise part of the EVP.

For example, in Google’s earlier days you could go their career site and it would take you to the menu of the free food they were serving up that was made by one of the ex-chefs of my favourite rock band. Google still provides free food by the way, and perhaps even free laundry at some of their locations. Their employees value this.

Whether it’s because of mentorship, cool technology, or free food, the EVP is definitely not dead.

Companies more than ever need to provide compelling reasons to applicants about why they would want to work for them.